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Donor Drive 4 Dorothy | Acute Myeloid Leukemia
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Acute Myeloid Leukemia

What is Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)?

 

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) has many names, including acute myelocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute granulocytic leukemia, and acute non-lymphocytic leukemia. “Acute” means that the leukemia can progress quickly, and if not treated, would probably be fatal in a few months. “Myeloid” refers to the type of cell the leukemia starts from.

 

AML is a cancer that starts in cells that would normally develop into different types of blood cells. Most cases of AML develop from cells that would turn into white blood cells (other than lymphocytes), but some cases of AML develop in other types of blood-forming cells. The different types of AML are listed in the section called “How is acute myeloid leukemia classified?”.

 

AML starts in the bone marrow (the soft inner part of the bones, where new blood cells are made), but in most cases it quickly moves into the blood. It can sometimes spread to other parts of the body including the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), and testicles.

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